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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
with brooking news on the looming fiscal cliff. for the past few nights we've been telling you about the frustrating lack of progress to avert a deal on automatic tax hikes and spending cuts that kick in less than four weeks from now. poll after poll shows the american people want compromise but there weren't many signs that was going to happen, nothing was getting done. in a cnn/crc poll, 67% said washington officials would behave like spoiled children in the fiscal cliff discussions. only 28% said they would behave like adults. tonight signs that maybe some adult behavior might be prevail and a compromise might be reached. jessica yellen joins us, dana bash and david gergen. what's the latest? >> reporter: they are a long way from a deal, but late today speaker boehner and president obama did speak to one another on the phone. now, this is an important development because it's the first time they've talked in a week about the fiscal cliff. i am told, though, that there was no real progress in negotiations. in this sense there was no breakthrough on that central point of tax rates.
to the fiscal cliff and not one iota closer to a deal to avoid it. now, on january 1st, four weeks from today, automatic tax hikes and spending cuts kick in with potentially serious consequences for virtually every taxpayer in america. there has been zero progress on a deal, zero. keeping them honest though, the american people clearly want some sort of a compromise. polls show they want results but the two sides are still far apart on the issue at the heart of the debate, whether the wealthiest americans should pay more taxes than they do right now. the people you elected to get things done simply are not getting it done, not even close. but maybe we should not be surprised, because in a cnn/orc poll taken a few weeks ago, 67% said washington officials would behave like spoiled children in fiscal cliff discussions. only 28% said they would behave like responsible adults. with that in mind, here's what the key players, the grownups, have said in just the past 24 hours. listen. >> the math, it doesn't work. >> his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table until h
went off the fiscal cliff a long time ago when we doubled the size of the government in the last 11 years and when we gave increased benefits in medicare without creating tax revenue source to pay for it. the question is not medicare, social security, why would you not just address the issues facing our country and the very things that are going to cripple us if we don't address them? ann and saving medicare, guaranteeing that benefit to people in the future out to be important. we have 3 million people this year that are going to go in to medicare and three million the next and the next. >> what leverage do you think republicans have to force and get a deal? >> i don't know. i think, again, that's washington speak for politics, rather than policy. again, i think we ought to raise it another notch up. shouldn't we be having the president of the united states with the leaders of both houses of congress come together and say what are the real problems in the short term and long term facing our country. should we not be about addressing those and about decreasing the massive growth of
is willing to go over the fiscal cliff if republicans don't agree to raising taxes on the rich. all this week, we've been focusing on what it is about this congress and this administration that makes it seem like compromise is a dirty word. certainly the extremes in the party seem to view it that way. we've been talking with past congressional leaders who have sat down at the negotiating table, facing sharp differences with the other political party in the past and still managing to come out with a deal. today, i spoke a short while ago with former senate majority leader trent lott, author of "herding cats: a life in politics." senator lott, you and senator mitchell wrote op-eds. and offering some solutions. you said one solution is to hold congress at hearings, marking up bills going on legislation. most americans would agree with that but be surprised to hear, i mean, that's their job. i think most of us, you know, would assume, isn't that their job description? >> well, they've slowly slipped away from that over the last four years, i guess, particularly the last two years. the senate hasn
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)